Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou ( April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014) was an American poet, memoirist, and civil rights activist. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning over 50 years. She received dozens of awards and more than 50 honorary degrees.

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Just as hope rings through laughter it can also shine through tears.

My life has been one great big joke, a dance that's walked, a song that's spoke. I laugh so hard I almost choke when I think about myself.

There is nothing so pitiful as a young cynic, because he has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing.

All great achievements require time.

God puts rainbows in the clouds so that each of us, in the dreariest and most dreaded moments, can see a possibility of hope.

I'm not going anywhere. I came here to say something and I'm not leaving until I'm finished.

It is the worst thing you can do, women, is whine... I mean the worst. Don't complain, protest.

History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.

You can't be consistently fair, consistently generous, consistently just, or consistently merciful. You can be anything erratically, but to be that thing time after time after time you have to have courage.

Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.

How important it is for us to recognize and celebrate our heroes and she-roes!

Life is a gift and i try to respond with grace and courtesy

Nature has no mercy at all. Nature says "I'm going to snow. If you have on a bikini and no snowshoes, that's tough. I am going to snow anyway."

Listen carefully to what country people call mother wit. In those homely sayings are couched the collective wisdom of generations.

Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.

I've learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage and tangled Christmas tree lights.

As far as I knew, white women were never lonely, except in books. White men adored them, Black men desired them and Black women worked for them.

At the worst of times there's the possibility of seeing hope... That's why that song is so important right now.

I speak to the black experience but I am always talking about the human condition - about what we can endure, dream, fail at, and still survive.

Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible.

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